newyorker:


Beginning in the late fifties, The New Yorker ran a series of short Talk items about captivating graffiti slogans. Most of these accounts were brief, including simply the location and a description of the graffiti in question. The magazine chronicled an early example of literary graffiti that would take on greater artistic significance. In 1957, a keen-eyed New Yorker contributor published a small item about someone who had recently visited an “espresso joint” in Greenwich Village. The visitor took note of a phrase that was written, in elegant calligraphy, on the wall beside his chair: “Who’s afraid of Virginia Woolf?” Years later, the playwright Edward Albee, who was often asked about the title of his 1962 play, told The Paris Review how he’d been inspired by a line of graffiti that he had seen scrawled on the wall of a Greenwich Village establishment during the mid-fifties. Perhaps this was the very same scribbling the magazine had noted in its pages nearly five years before the play’s début.

Click-through to continue reading a history of polite graffiti in The New Yorker: 
http://nyr.kr/WMyqDb

newyorker:

Beginning in the late fifties, The New Yorker ran a series of short Talk items about captivating graffiti slogans. Most of these accounts were brief, including simply the location and a description of the graffiti in question. The magazine chronicled an early example of literary graffiti that would take on greater artistic significance. In 1957, a keen-eyed New Yorker contributor published a small item about someone who had recently visited an “espresso joint” in Greenwich Village. The visitor took note of a phrase that was written, in elegant calligraphy, on the wall beside his chair: “Who’s afraid of Virginia Woolf?” Years later, the playwright Edward Albee, who was often asked about the title of his 1962 play, told The Paris Review how he’d been inspired by a line of graffiti that he had seen scrawled on the wall of a Greenwich Village establishment during the mid-fifties. Perhaps this was the very same scribbling the magazine had noted in its pages nearly five years before the play’s début.

Click-through to continue reading a history of polite graffiti in The New Yorker: 

http://nyr.kr/WMyqDb

  1. forwardeyes reblogged this from woodlawn-street
  2. 1280800 reblogged this from somersaultmag
  3. artsyyak reblogged this from newyorker
  4. sixtyminutesmoreorless reblogged this from newyorker
  5. roscoebardot reblogged this from newyorker
  6. cognitiveartifacts reblogged this from newyorker
  7. lovelevagabond reblogged this from newyorker
  8. thereelingnightshowhost reblogged this from newyorker
  9. marianlorraine reblogged this from lovenat
  10. nellavig reblogged this from newyorker
  11. thesarahapple1 reblogged this from newyorker and added:
    DUDE… This is why tagging is still cool.
  12. anfrn reblogged this from newyorker
  13. cravingdesires reblogged this from newyorker and added:
    Beginning in the late fifties, The New Yorker ran a series of short Talk items about captivating graffiti slogans. Most...
  14. misterthief reblogged this from newyorker
  15. pinnednyc reblogged this from newyorker
Blog comments powered by Disqus